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Eindhoven University of Technology


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Innovation - Computer Science - 22.05.2024
A new and efficient chip design will demand even more of modern chip machines
A new and efficient chip design will demand even more of modern chip machines
How TU/e researchers push further the performance of computer chips while at the same time making them more efficient. Nowadays, it's hard to envision the world without computers. But the ever better performing chips in smartphones, cars, and almost every modern device are consuming more and more power.

Environment - Innovation - 10.05.2024
When simply reusing solar panels beats recycling
When simply reusing solar panels beats recycling
Core changemakers wants to give used solar panels a second life. As the world steadily progresses towards a more sustainable future, recycling solar panels becomes increasingly relevant. However, in some cases, simply reusing old solar panels is better. CORE CHANGEMAKERS, once a student team at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and now evolving into a startup, is exploring the possibility of using old solar panels.

Physics - Health - 22.04.2024
A nanophotonic fiber-tip solution to detect the ultrasmall
A nanophotonic fiber-tip solution to detect the ultrasmall
Using an ultrasensitive photonic crystal, TU/e researchers were able to detect single particles down to 50 nanometers in diameter. The new research has just been published in the journal Optica. What do volcanic lava, fire smoke, automobile exhaust fumes, and printer toner have in common? They are all sources of ultrafine particles - particles with a diameter below 100 nanometers, which can pose serious health risks if inhaled.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 11.04.2024
Our brain as an example
Our brain as an example
TU/e researcher Imke Krauhausen built new electronic devices based on neuromorphic computing Our brain can process complex information at lightning speed using very little energy. This is why there is rapidly growing interest in the human brain as a model for the development of new computer technology.

Health - 09.04.2024
Improved monitoring of dangerous aneurysms
Improved monitoring of dangerous aneurysms
During her doctoral research, Esther Maas investigated the use of new ultrasound techniques to image dangerous aortic aneurysms for patient-specific care. An aneurysm is a dangerous vascular condition in which a weak spot in a vessel wall can bulge like a balloon. In the aorta, the largest artery in the abdomen, such an aneurysm is life-threatening, especially when it bursts.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.04.2024
Better understanding of how breast cancer works
Better understanding of how breast cancer works
In her research into the response of breast cancer to the hormone estrogen, PhD candidate Stacey Joosten studied not only hormone-sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women but also in men and in women before the menopause. The aim was to gain an even better understanding of how this type of breast cancer works.

Health - Psychology - 21.03.2024
App demonstrates importance of broader treatment approach to narcolepsy
App demonstrates importance of broader treatment approach to narcolepsy
PhD candidate Laury Quaedackers studied how a special app can improve the quality of life for people with narcolepsy. She defended her thesis on March 21 at the Department of Industrial Design. Narcolepsy is a rare but serious sleep disorder. People with narcolepsy fall asleep involuntarily at random times.

Mathematics - Computer Science - 20.03.2024
Controlling chaotic turbulence to make ’cat-coat’ patterns in fluids
Researchers from TU/e and the University of Chicago discovered how to manipulate turbulent flows to create regular patterns like those seen in the tabby coat pattern of a cat. The new research has been published in Nature. Controlling the chaos of a turbulent flow to make regular patterns sounds like a contradiction in every sense of the word.

Chemistry - Physics - 29.02.2024
Synthetic material sheds new light on how liquids separate
Synthetic material sheds new light on how liquids separate
Hailin Fu found the chemical system that behaves like cell organelles with well-defined segregated areas in a water-based solution by accident. She followed the science to the end though, and she describes her and her colleagues' journey of discovery in a new paper just published in Nature. It is quite rare to see a Nature article, with all'authors on the paper coming from the same institute.

Health - Innovation - 27.02.2024
Improving a non-invasive way to monitor contractions during labor
Improving a non-invasive way to monitor contractions during labor
Kirsten Thijssen defended her PhD thesis at the Department of Electrical Engineering on February 22nd. Her research was completed at Máxima Medical Center and Eindhoven University of Technology. Uterine contractions are a key part of childbirth, but they can temporarily reduce oxygen supply to the fetus.

Physics - Materials Science - 09.02.2024
What did the electron 'say' to the phonon in the graphene sandwich?
What did the electron ’say’ to the phonon in the graphene sandwich?
A TU/e and Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology-led collaboration involving researchers from around the world has the answer, and the why, and the results have just been published in the journal Science Advances. Electrons carry electrical energy, while vibrational energy is carried by phonons.

Health - Sport - 08.02.2024
Keeping track: doctor monitors your heart at home
Keeping track: doctor monitors your heart at home
On January 8, professor and cardiologist Hareld Kemps will hold his oration within the Department of Industrial Design. To improve supervision of patients with chronic heart failure, Hareld Kemps, a cardiologist specializing in sports, took inspiration from the professional soccer players and cyclists that come see him.

Health - 01.02.2024
Less invasive for patients: using blood tests to diagnose lung cancer
Less invasive for patients: using blood tests to diagnose lung cancer
Sylvia Roovers-Genet defended her PhD thesis at the Department of Biomedical Engineering on February 1st. Currently, when lung cancer is suspected, a 'morsel' of tissue is removed and examined under the microscope. This may change in the future. During her PhD research, Sylvia Roovers-Genet examined proteins in the blood of people with, without, and with possible lung cancer, and thereby developed a method to demonstrate the presence of lung cancer through blood tests.

Environment - Chemistry - 09.01.2024
This is how Professor René Janssen paves the way to better solar cells
This is how Professor René Janssen paves the way to better solar cells
A professor at TU/e and colleagues have found a way to improve perovskite solar cells. An electric car, heat pump, or robotic lawn mower: the world is electrifying, and so more and more roofs are full of solar panels. The Netherlands is even among the European leaders when it comes to generating solar energy.

Electroengineering - Transport - 19.12.2023
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Along with ElaadNL, PhD researcher Tim Slangen studied the phenomenon known as supraharmonic disturbances, which can adversely affect the operation and efficiency of electrical appliances. With the growing and obvious concerns about climate change, the transition from fossil to renewable energy is accelerating.

Health - Computer Science - 19.12.2023
Collaboration is key in esophageal cancer screening
Collaboration is key in esophageal cancer screening
More than a decade of research at TU/e, led by Fons van der Sommen, has culminated in a scientific publication in The Lancet Digital Health this December. The study focuses on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to detect incipient esophageal cancer in people with Barrett's esophagus. It is 2011.

Health - Career - 18.12.2023
A more pleasant workplace to improve mental health
A more pleasant workplace to improve mental health
Anna Bergefurt defended her PhD thesis cum laude at the Department of Built Environment on December 18th. How do plants, noise, and the view outside affect your stress level, concentration or mood? PhD researcher Lisanne Bergefurt examined how different aspects of the physical workplace can influence employees' mental health.

Pharmacology - Health - 29.11.2023
Chemo-gel shows promise in the treatment of peritoneal cancer
Chemo-gel shows promise in the treatment of peritoneal cancer
A special gel with chemotherapy against peritoneal cancer, that is what start-up UPyTher is working on. The new technology could save many lives in the future. Each year, more than one million people worldwide contract peritoneal cancer. It is often the result of metastasis from colon, stomach, or ovarian cancer to the peritoneal cavity.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2023
The rules of growing tissue
The rules of growing tissue
Laura Rijns defended her PhD thesis cum laude at the Department of Biomedical Engineering on November 10th. In human tissue, the cells are embedded in the 'extracellular matrix'. This matrix is made up of fiber-like structures that provide firmness to the tissue, but also influence cell behavior and facilitate cell growth.

Electroengineering - Campus - 01.11.2023
Measuring 5G antennas in the reverberation chamber
Measuring 5G antennas in the reverberation chamber
Anouk Hubrechsen defended her PhD thesis cum laude at the Department of Electrical Engineering on October 26th. We are using ever more (smart) devices connected to the 5G network. The high-frequency antennas they contain are often integrated with chips, and this adds a layer of complexity to testing.
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