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Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2023
Important antibody in our blood found to carry a surprise
Important antibody in our blood found to carry a surprise
The structure of one of the most abundant antibodies in our blood, Immunoglobulin M (IgM), turns out to be different than previously thought: it contains an additional protein known as CD5L. This discovery, made by Utrecht researchers under the guidance of Albert Heck and colleagues at Sanquin in Amsterdam, is now published in the scientific journal PNAS .

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.12.2023
Methane emissions from canals underestimated
Researchers have so far underestimated methane emissions from canals in five major Dutch cities. That is the conclusion of microbiologist Koen Pelsma, who will defend his PhD thesis on this topic at Radboud University on 13 December. In calculations of methane emissions from water, far too little is known about emissions from urban waters such as canals, says researcher Koen Pelsma.

Life Sciences - 04.12.2023
Working attitude and school grades are subject to common genetic influences
Working attitude and school grades are subject to common genetic influences
Pupils with a high level of self-control and grit generally achieve better grades. Many assume that this good working attitude results in better grades, but biological psychologists at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) have discovered that the relationship is less causal than thought. Children predisposed to a good work attitude also are also predisposed to good academic performance.

Life Sciences - 04.12.2023
Reward sensitivity plays a role in youth crime
Reward sensitivity plays a role in youth crime
Boys who associate with delinquent friends are more likely to display antisocial behavior. A new study by neuroscientists and behavior experts from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Amsterdam UMC shows that this association is stronger in boys with an increased sensitivity to reward. For the first time, a scientific study on antisocial behavior has demonstrated an interaction effect between a brain mechanism, measured with functional MRI scans, and an environmental factor.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.11.2023
Plant protects next generation via soil
Plant protects next generation via soil
Plants recruit soil bacteria to protect against downy mildew, forming a leaf-based defense system. The bacteria not only combat pathogens but also leave a protective legacy in the soil for the next plant generation. This discovery, published today by Utrecht biologists, offers a promising path toward creating crops that naturally fend off diseases, reducing reliance on harmful pesticides in agriculture.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2023
The rules of growing tissue
The rules of growing tissue
Laura Rijns defended her PhD thesis cum laude at the Department of Biomedical Engineering on November 10th. In human tissue, the cells are embedded in the 'extracellular matrix'. This matrix is made up of fiber-like structures that provide firmness to the tissue, but also influence cell behavior and facilitate cell growth.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.10.2023
TU Delft joins EBRAINS: advancing brain research and innovation
Today marks a significant milestone as TU Delft officially joins EBRAINS, a state-of-the-art digital research infrastructure developed by the EU-funded Human Brain Project, which serves as a comprehensive hub for brain-related data and tools. Its overarching mission is to facilitate collaborative research and translate scientific breakthroughs into tangible innovations, ultimately improving the lives of patients and benefiting society as a whole.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 26.10.2023
DNA Origami nanoturbine sets new horizon for nanomotors
DNA Origami nanoturbine sets new horizon for nanomotors
A collaborative team of researchers led by prof. Cees Dekker at TU Delft, in partnership with international colleagues, introduces a pioneering breakthrough in the world of nanomotors - the DNA origami nanoturbine. This nanoscale device could represent a paradigm shift, harnessing power from ion gradients or electrical potential across a solid-state nanopore to drive the turbine into mechanical rotations.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.10.2023
An atlas of the human brain - mapping every brain cell
An international team of neuroscientists has constructed highly detailed maps of the adult ape and human brain. They have also depicted various developmental stages of the brain before and after birth. It is the most comprehensive and detailed map of mammalian brains ever created. VU Amsterdam neuroscientists Natalia Goriounova, Christiaan de Kock, and Huib Mansvelder, along with neurosurgeons from Amsterdam UMC, contributed to this atlas.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.10.2023
Amazon may hold over 10,000 hidden earthworks made by past civilizations
Amazon may hold over 10,000 hidden earthworks made by past civilizations
The Amazon rainforest may be home to thousands of hidden earthworks, made by pre-Columbian civilizations. This is revealed by a large international study investigating the distribution of these hidden structures. Biologist Hans ter Steege contributed to the research. "This discovery tells us that certain parts of the forest may not be as old as we initially thought." The dense Amazon Rainforest may hold far more traces of human civilization than previously believed.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.10.2023
New technique to study the interaction between cells
Cells are at the foundation of life. To gain a better understanding of essential life processes, we need to comprehend the language cells use to interact with each other. Biophysical scientist Christian Niederauer from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam has developed a new method to study this interaction.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.10.2023
Revealing the 'sweet secrets' of coronavirus cell entry
Revealing the ’sweet secrets’ of coronavirus cell entry
Researchers from the Utrecht University have uncovered a sophisticated mechanism by which coronavirus spike proteins can be activated for cell entry. The study , published today in the scientific journal Nature, used powerful microscopes and computer simulations to reveal how a tiny sugar molecule binds to a human coronavirus spike and triggers exposure of components that are required to invade the host cell.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.09.2023
Cutting-edge plant research lab NPEC opens its doors in Utrecht
Cutting-edge plant research lab NPEC opens its doors in Utrecht
Equipped with advanced robotics, hyperspectral imaging, laser scanners, climate chambers, and other installations, the Netherlands Plant Eco-phenotyping Centre (NPEC) opens its doors today in Utrecht. Researchers at this lab can automatically monitor the growth and development of thousands of plants.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.09.2023
Shining a new light on cell response in the body
Shining a new light on cell response in the body
Researchers develop a new, light-responsive hydrogel upon which cells can grow to study how cells deal with changes in their environment. Our cells have a complex relationship with the body's microenvironment. It has been studied in the lab, but, to date, most studies leave out dynamic changes to the microenvironment.

Life Sciences - 27.09.2023
An easy way of making aquaculture more sustainable
Changing the way that carp are fed can substantially reduce the amount of ammonia they excrete compared to when they eat the same amount of food all at once. This finding is one of the outcomes of Wouter Mes's PhD research at Radboud University. Mes researched zebrafish and carp (the most commonly bred fish in the world) as part of his PhD.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2023
Glow-in-the-dark at the general practitioner
Glow-in-the-dark at the general practitioner
Eva van Aalen defended her PhD thesis at the Department of Biomedical Engineering on September 15th. TU/e researcher Eva van Aalen has developed a glow-in-the-dark test that can make disease diagnosis by general practitioners or in hospitals faster. This test could potentially also be used by patients at home, for example to monitor the concentration of certain drugs in the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.09.2023
Breakthrough way to train neuromorphic chips
Breakthrough way to train neuromorphic chips
Using a biosensor to detect cystic fibrosis as the test case, TU/e researchers have devised an innovative way to train neuromorphic chips as presented in a new paper in Nature Electronics. Neuromorphic computers - which are based on the structure of the human brain - could revolutionize our future healthcare devices.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.08.2023
New antibiotic from microbial ’dark matter’ could be powerful weapon against superbugs
A new powerful antibiotic, isolated from bacteria that could not be studied before, seems capable of combating harmful bacteria and even multi-resistant 'superbugs'. Named Clovibactin, the antibiotic appears to kill bacteria in an unusual manner, making it more difficult for bacteria to develop any resistance against it.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 03.08.2023
NWO Veni grants for research into frontline workers, social media and more
The Dutch Research Council (NWO) has awarded a Veni grant to ten young researchers at Radboud University. With this grant of up to 280.000 euro they can further elaborate their own ideas during a period of three years. Veni is aimed at excellent researchers who have recently obtained their PhDs.

Life Sciences - Physics - 24.07.2023
DNA origami to create virus capsids of all shapes and sizes
In an international collaboration involving the University of Twente and universities in Finland and Australia, researchers have succeeded in reprogramming the capsids of plant viruses into different shapes. They did this by folding nanoscale DNA structures into moulds around which the capsids form.